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Copernicus Sees Apollo Launch Pad

17 Jul 2019, 05:01 UTC
Copernicus Sees Apollo Launch Pad
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

It’s fun to see Copernicus take part in the Apollo 11 Anniversary with this image of the Apollo 11 launch pad as the area is now.

ESA has a larger version of this image, the file size is about 8.5 MB so if you have a slower connection it might take some time. Here’s the link. I do highly recommend looking at it though because it is excellent.

The image contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO

Here’s ESA’s caption:

Celebrating 50 years since Apollo 11 blasted off with the first humans that would walk on the Moon, Copernicus Sentinel-2 captures the historic launch site at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, US.

On 16 July 1969, the Saturn V rocket carrying Apollo 11 began its momentous voyage to the Moon. It lifted off from launch pad 39A – which can be seen in this Copernicus Sentinel-2 image from 29 January 2019. Launch pad 39A is the second pad down from the top (the launch pad at the far top is 39B).

The crew – Neil Armstrong, mission commander, Michael Collins, command module pilot and Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin, lunar module pilot – ...

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