Home » News & Blogs » A young, hot exoplanet observed for the first time using optical interferometry
Bookmark and Share
Bad Astronomy

A young, hot exoplanet observed for the first time using optical interferometry

7 Jun 2019, 13:00 UTC
A young, hot exoplanet observed for the first time using optical interferometry ESO/L. Cal├žada

If you look in the infrared part of the spectrum, outside what our eyes can see, stars tend to be fainter and planets brighter, so that helps with contrast.

This technique was used to directly image not just one but a system of exoplanets orbiting the star HR 8799. This is a very young star, only about 30 million years old (the Sun is 4.6 billion years of age, for comparison) and very close, about 128 light years away. That last bit helps too, because the closer a star is to us the farther the planets will appear to be from it (just like you can easily separate two fingers if they are held right in front of your face, but not if the hand is a kilometer away).

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod