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A viewing guide to the totally eclipsed supermoon of 21 January 2019

17 Jan 2019, 22:31 UTC
A viewing guide to the totally eclipsed supermoon of 21 January 2019
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The total lunar eclipse of 21 January 2019 is visible in its entirety from the Americas, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Portugal, the British Isles and far Western Europe. This looping animation shows the eclipse’s progress from 03:30—07:00 UTC at fifteen-minute intervals. Celestial north is up and east is left. AN animation by Ade Ashford.If skies remain clear for around 3½ hours starting 03:30 UTC (3:30am GMT) on 21 January, observers located on the lunar-facing hemisphere of Earth can witness the key stages of one of nature’s glorious spectacles – a total lunar eclipse. And the best part is that you need no specialist equipment to enjoy it, just the naked eye.
What’s more, this month’s full Moon occurs just 14¾ hours before the lunar orb passes closest to Earth in its orbit. Hence the Moon will appear somewhat larger than normal, which by one definition makes it a supermoon. As viewed from the heart of the British Isles at the instant of full Moon – 5:16am GMT on 21 January – the Moon lies 354,984 kilometres distant and has an apparent size of 33&frac23 arcminutes, which is 9¼ percent larger than an average full Moon.
Schematic diagram of the shadow cast ...

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