Home » News & Blogs » ‘Crasher Asteroids’ Photobomb Hubble’s Deep Gaze Into the Universe
Bookmark and Share
Astroengine

‘Crasher Asteroids’ Photobomb Hubble’s Deep Gaze Into the Universe

3 Nov 2017, 19:44 UTC
‘Crasher Asteroids’ Photobomb Hubble’s Deep Gaze Into the Universe
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

NASA, ESA, and B. Sunnquist and J. Mack (STScI)
Like the infamous “Crasher Squirrel” that launched one of the most prolific memes in online history, “crasher asteroids” have photobombed the Hubble Space Telescope’s otherwise uninterrupted view of the ancient universe.
While carrying out its Frontier Fields survey of a random postage stamp-sized part of the sky in the direction of the galaxy cluster Abell 370, Hubble imaged many galaxies located at different distances over different epochs in time.
Visible in the observation are elliptical galaxies and spiral galaxies. Many are bright and bluish, but the vast majority are dim and reddish. The reddest blobs are the most distant galaxies in our observable universe; their light has been stretched (red-shifted) after traveling for billions of years through an expanding cosmos. These galaxies are the most ancient galaxies that formed within a billion years after the Big Bang.
But mixed in with this Hubble view of ancient light are bright arcs and dashes — tracks carved out by the rocky junk in our own solar system that is drifting in Hubble’s field of view, located a mere 160 million miles from Earth (on average). It’s sobering to think that the light ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod