Home » News & Blogs » TRAPPIST-1: The ‘Habitable’ Star System That’s Probably a Hellhole
Bookmark and Share
Astroengine

TRAPPIST-1: The ‘Habitable’ Star System That’s Probably a Hellhole

18 Jul 2017, 21:01 UTC
TRAPPIST-1: The ‘Habitable’ Star System That’s Probably a Hellhole
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Red dwarfs can be angry little stars (NASA/GSFC/S. Wiessinger)
There are few places that elicit such vivid thoughts of exotic habitable exoplanets than TRAPPIST-1 — a star system located less than 40 light-years from Earth. Alas, according to two recent studies, the planetary system surrounding the tiny red dwarf star may actually be horrible.
For anyone who knows a thing or two about red dwarfs, this may not come as a surprise. Although they are much smaller than our sun, red dwarfs can pack a powerful space weather punch for any world that orbits too close. And, by their nature, any habitable zone surrounding a red dwarf would have to be really compact, a small detail that would bury any “habitable” exoplanet in a terrible onslaught of ultraviolet radiation and a blowtorch of stellar winds. These factors would make the space weather environment around TRAPPIST-1 extreme to say the least.
“The concept of a habitable zone is based on planets being in orbits where liquid water could exist,” said Manasvi Lingam, a Harvard University researcher who led a Center for Astrophysics (CfA) study, published in the International Journal of Astrobiology. “This is only one factor, however, in determining whether a ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod