Home » News & Blogs » Today Juno Will Get Our Best Look Yet at Jupiter’s Great Red Spot
Bookmark and Share
Lights in the Dark

Today Juno Will Get Our Best Look Yet at Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

10 Jul 2017, 15:32 UTC
Today Juno Will Get Our Best Look Yet at Jupiter’s Great Red Spot
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Image of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot captured by Voyager 1 in 1979. Processed by Björn Jónsson.
Today, June 10 (June 11 UTC) NASA’s Juno spacecraft will make its first targeted flyover of Jupiter’s famous Great Red Spot since its arrival in orbit on July 4, 2016, getting our best look yet at the giant anticyclonic storm that’s been churning on the giant planet since at least 1830 (and possibly even since before 1665.)
Previous spacecraft (Voyager, Galileo, Cassini, New Horizons) have imaged the Great Red Spot but none from as close a distance as Juno will tonight. During P7—Juno’s seventh “perijove,” or closest point to Jupiter in its 53-day-long orbital path—Juno will pass over the GRS at an altitude of only about 5,600 miles.
Perijove (the point at which an orbit comes closest to Jupiter’s center) will be on Monday, July 10, at 6:55 p.m. PDT (9:55 p.m. EDT). At the time of perijove, Juno will be about 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers) above the planet’s cloud tops. Eleven minutes and 33 seconds later, Juno will have covered another 24,713 miles (39,771 kilometers) and will be directly above the coiling crimson cloud tops of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. The spacecraft will ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod