Home » News & Blogs » Red Mars Shines in the SW on November Evenings
Bookmark and Share
Dark Sky Telescope Hire

Red Mars Shines in the SW on November Evenings

11 Nov 2016, 11:51 UTC
Red Mars Shines in the SW on November Evenings
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

November 2016 is a great time to find Mars in the early evening sky. Look towards the south and south-west after dark on a clear November evening and you’ll find an orange-red ‘star’ hanging low towards the horizon. Its unmistakable red hue is easy to see with the naked eye and in binoculars. With a moderate-sized telescope and a 10mm lens you should make out Mars as a tiny orange-red disc of light that looks quite different to the surrounding stars.

Mars is a small world. It is just over half the size of Earth. By mid November the Red Planet will be more than 200 million kilometres away from us. At this distance a telescope shows Mars as a mostly featureless red-orange dot. That said, do look out for a slight brightening or whiter patch along the lower limb of the dot, which is the Martian ice cap made up mostly of frozen carbon dioxide.

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod