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MISSE: Testing Materials In Space

19 Mar 2017, 17:37 UTC
MISSE: Testing Materials In Space
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

If you had a really, really, really good telescope and took a peep at the International Space Station (which would be quite a feat for as quickly as it moves across the sky), you might notice what looks like a make-up kit or a watercolor palette dangling from the side of the station.
MISSE-3 just prior to retrieval during an STS-118 spacewalk. – Credit: NASA
While some astronauts have taken their makeup into space, and some have found time to create art in orbit, they don’t tend to leave their supplies attached to the outside of the ISS. Ruling those out, instead what you’d probably be looking at is a Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE).
MISSE project specimens are placed onto trays and inserted into Passive Experiment Containers (PECs). – Credit: NASA
MISSE projects serve as a laboratory to test and study various material samples as they’re exposed to a space environment. Attached on the outside of the ISS, the specimens are simultaneously exposed to a variety of conditions that would be very difficult, if even possible, to mimic on Earth, including exposure to: atomic oxygen, various levels of radiation, vacuum, extreme temperatures, and zero gravity. While MISSE wasn’t ...

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