Home » News & Blogs » Minimum viable microwave-based space-based solar power system
Bookmark and Share
Selenian Boondocks

Minimum viable microwave-based space-based solar power system

4 Sep 2015, 21:37 UTC
Minimum viable microwave-based space-based solar power system
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

The Solomon Islands pay almost $1/kWh for electricity. You could provide beamed solar power to them on a demonstration basis for a fraction of that price.
Unfortunately, being in the ocean is one of the worst places for beamed power, since you have lots of clouds and moisture and also saltwater which likes to corrode things. Even so, you could probably demonstrate space-based solar power to them on a scale that would be relevant but without costing too much. It’d be competitive with their $1/kWh pricing, once you set it up.
The military is tolerant of high energy prices, too. If you could setup a transportable, lightweight 200m diameter receiver that could power a whole military base day and night, you’d have a lot of interest, even if it cost $5-10/kWh. Those prices make beamed propulsion start to look viable, even if you end up throwing away 90% of your energy due to losses and an undersized receiver.
So how would we design such a system? Well, if we’re using microwaves (in order to reduce rainfade to only occur in the worst conditions, like heavy rain) at 10GHz and 3cm, then we’re limited to still needing very large antenna if ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod