Home » News & Blogs » Massive 30-ton MicroBooNE particle detector moved into place, will see neutrinos this year
Bookmark and Share
Quantum Diaries

Massive 30-ton MicroBooNE particle detector moved into place, will see neutrinos this year

25 Jun 2014, 18:02 UTC
Massive 30-ton MicroBooNE particle detector moved into place, will see neutrinos this year
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Fermilab published a version of this press release on June 24, 2014.
The 30-ton MicroBooNE neutrino detector is gently lowered into the Liquid-Argon Test Facility at Fermilab on Monday, June 23. The detector will become the centerpiece of the MicroBooNE experiment, which will study ghostly particles called neutrinos. Photo: Fermilab
On Monday, June 23, the next phase of neutrino physics at Fermilab fell (gently) into place.
The MicroBooNE detector – a 30-ton, 40-foot-long cylindrical metal tank designed to detect ghostly particles called neutrinos – was carefully transported by truck across the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermilab site, from an assembly building it was constructed in to the experimental hall three miles away.
The massive detector was then hoisted up with a crane, lowered through the open roof of the building and placed into its permanent home, directly in the path of Fermilab’s beam of neutrinos. There it will become the centerpiece of the MicroBooNE experiment, which will study those elusive particles to crack several big mysteries of the universe.
The MicroBooNE detector has been under construction for nearly two years. The tank contains a 32-foot-long “time projection chamber,” the largest ever built in the United States, equipped with 8,256 delicate ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod