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Kepler 80

30 Apr 2018, 14:45 UTC
Kepler 80

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<div><span style=”font-family: ‘Times New Roman’, serif; font-size: medium;”><span style=”color: black; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;”>Kepler-80 is an extrasolar system located 1100 light-years away. It is made of an orange dwarf star and at least six (super-)Earth-sized planets. In order of increasing distance from the star, the six planets are Kepler-80 f, d, e, b, c, and g.</span></span></div>
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<div><span style=”font-family: ‘Times New Roman’, serif; font-size: medium;”><span style=”color: black; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;”>The central star is of spectral type K5V and has <span lang=”de-CH”>a surface temperature of 4540 kelvins (4270 °C)</span>. Its radius and mass are about 70% of those of the Sun.</span></span></div>
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<div><span style=”font-family: ‘Times New Roman’, serif; font-size: medium;”><span style=”color: black; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;”>All six planets were discovered thanks to the observation of their transits by the </span><span style=”color: black; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;”><i>Kepler</i></span><span style=”color: black; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;”> space telescope, in 2012 for planets Kepler-80 b to f and in 2017 for Kepler-80 g. This system is interesting because the five outermost planets make a “resonant chain”: for each pair of adjacent planets, the orbital periods are close to an integer ratio, in this system either 2:3 or 3:4. This is analogous to the resonant chain of the seven TRAPPIST-1 planets.</span></span></div>
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<table class=” aligncenter” style=”width: 519px; height: 227px;”>
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<td style=”width: 120.828125px; text-align: left;”>Name</td>
<td style=”width: 70.453125px; text-align: right;”>Mass(M<sub>J</sub>)</td>
<td style=”width: 80.828125px; text-align: right;”>Radius(R<sub>J</sub>)</td>
<td style=”width: 90.9375px; text-align: right;”>Period(days)</td>
<td style=”width: 112.90625px; text-align: right;”>Discovery(date)</td>
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<td style=”width: 120.828125px; text-align: left;”>Kepler-80 b</td>
<td style=”width: 70.453125px; text-align: right;”>0.0218</td>
<td style=”width: 80.828125px; text-align: right;”>0.21</td>
<td style=”width: 90.9375px; text-align: right;”>7.05</td>
<td style=”width: 112.90625px; text-align: right;”>2012</td>
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<td style=”width: 120.828125px; text-align: left;”>Kepler-80 c</td>
<td style=”width: 70.453125px; text-align: right;”>0.0212</td>
<td style=”width: 80.828125px; text-align: right;”>0.23</td>
<td style=”width: 90.9375px; text-align: right;”>9.52</td>
<td style=”width: 112.90625px; text-align: right;”>2012</td>
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<td style=”width: 120.828125px; text-align: left;”>Kepler-80 d</td>
<td style=”width: 70.453125px; text-align: right;”>0.0212</td>
<td style=”width: 80.828125px; text-align: right;”>0.125</td>
<td style=”width: 90.9375px; text-align: right;”>3.07</td>
<td style=”width: 112.90625px; text-align: right;”>2012</td>
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<td style=”width: 120.828125px; text-align: left;”>Kepler-80 e</td>
<td style=”width: 70.453125px; text-align: right;”>0.013</td>
<td style=”width: 80.828125px; text-align: right;”>0.134</td>
<td style=”width: 90.9375px; text-align: right;”>4.64</td>
<td style=”width: 112.90625px; text-align: right;”>2012</td>
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<td style=”width: 120.828125px; text-align: left;”>Kepler-80 f</td>
<td style=”width: 70.453125px; text-align: right;”></td>
<td style=”width: 80.828125px; text-align: right;”>0.116</td>
<td style=”width: 90.9375px; text-align: right;”>0.99</td>
<td style=”width: 112.90625px; text-align: right;”>2012</td>
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<td style=”width: 120.828125px; text-align: left;”>Kepler-80 g</td>
<td style=”width: 70.453125px; text-align: right;”></td>
<td style=”width: 80.828125px; text-align: right;”>0.101</td>
<td style=”width: 90.9375px; text-align: right;”>14.6</td>
<td style=”width: 112.90625px; text-align: right;”>2017</td>
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