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NASA Centers Collaborate to Advance Quiet Supersonic Technology During Pandemic

27 Nov 2020, 15:02 UTC
NASA Centers Collaborate to Advance Quiet Supersonic Technology During Pandemic
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A NASA F/A-18 is towed to the apron at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California during sunrise over Rogers Dry Lake. The F/A-18 was used to test a transmitter for an air navigation system, called the Airborne Location Integrating Geospatial Navigation System, or ALIGNS. This system, designed to allow pilots to position their aircraft at precise distances to each other, will be critical for acoustic validation efforts of NASA’s next supersonic X-plane, the X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology. (Credits: NASA/Lauren Hughes)

EDWARDS, Calif. (NASA PR) — Two NASA centers on opposite sides of the countries are finding new ways to work together to support the agency’s mission to develop quiet supersonic technology, in spite of thousands of miles of distance and a global pandemic.

Using their available labs, Kennedy Space Center in Florida is building tools in collaboration with Armstrong Flight Research Center in California, which NASA will use in support of the X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology X-plane, or QueSST.

Flying at faster-than-sound speeds over communities around the U.S., the X-59 will demonstrate technology to reduce the loud sonic booms, typically heard below aircraft flying at supersonic speeds, to a quieter noise similar to a car door closing in ...

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