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NOAA weather satellite transitions to new role for U.S. military

13 Sep 2020, 22:46 UTC
NOAA weather satellite transitions to new role for U.S. military
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A view of the Earth from the EWS-G1 satellite, formerly known as GOES–13, taken on Sept. 1, 2020, from its new location over the Indian Ocean. Credit: U.S. Space Force’s MARK IV-B Program Office
A weather satellite built and launched for NOAA in 2006 to help track hurricanes approaching the United States has been repositioned to monitor weather conditions in the Middle East to support U.S. military operations in the region.
The GOES-13 satellite, no longer needed for monitoring weather over the United States, was transferred from NOAA to the U.S. Air Force last year under an interagency agreement. The Space Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center announced Sept. 8 that the spacecraft has arrived and commenced operations at a new location in geostationary orbit over the Indian Ocean.
The spacecraft has been renamed the Electro-optical Infrared Weather system Geostationary 1, or EWS-G1, spacecraft.
The EWS-G1 spacecraft is the first geostationary weather satellite owned by the Department of Defense, the Space Force said in a statement. “The satellite provides timely cloud characterization and theater weather imagery to DoD in the Indian Ocean region, addressing needs across Central Command and other operating theaters,” the military said.
Central Command oversees U.S. military ...

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