Home » News & Blogs » The Fallout from COVID-19 on Astronomy’s Most Vulnerable Groups
Bookmark and Share
Women in Astronomy

The Fallout from COVID-19 on Astronomy’s Most Vulnerable Groups

16 Jul 2020, 13:00 UTC
The Fallout from COVID-19 on Astronomy’s Most Vulnerable Groups
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Aparna Venkatesan (U. of San Francisco), Ed Bertschinger (MIT), Dara Norman (NOIRLab), Sarah Tuttle (U. of Washington, Seattle), Kelsie Krafton (AAS Bahcall Public Policy Fellow) Reaching to the stars by Ares Nguyen via flickrThis has not been the year any of us envisioned. We are in the midst of a global pandemic that is still raging in many countries, including the U.S. For many of us in academe or higher education, the challenges of an unprecedented spring look likely to continue through most, if not all, of the next academic year. We attempt here to begin a discussion of the enormous and still-increasing fallout from COVID-19 and other national/global crises on astronomy as well as STEM. We began to write this post in mid-May but have had to continuously update it as numerous crises spanning many arenas have emerged. A Storm of CrisesFrom the earliest stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, its fallout on the most vulnerable populations in our world, and our field, has been visible, well documented, and steadily gaining in scope (see e.g. COVID Black), the newly released AIP report on COVID-19’s impact on the physical sciences, the impact of COVID-19 on gender equity in academe (Malisch+2020), and ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod