Home » News & Blogs » Antarctic IceCube observatory tracks a single neutrino to solve cosmic ray puzzle
Bookmark and Share
Geekwire

Antarctic IceCube observatory tracks a single neutrino to solve cosmic ray puzzle

12 Jul 2018, 15:00 UTC
Antarctic IceCube observatory tracks a single neutrino to solve cosmic ray puzzle
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

In this artistic rendering, a blazar is accelerating protons that produce pions, which produce neutrinos and gamma rays. One neutrino’s path is represented by a blue line passing through Antarctica, while a gamma ray’s path is shown in pink. (IceCube / NASA Illustration)
An array of detectors buried under a half-mile-wide stretch of Antarctic ice has traced the path of a single neutrino back to a supermassive black hole in a faraway galaxy, shedding light on a century-old cosmic ray mystery in the process.
The discovery, revealed today in a trio of research papers published by the journal Science and The Astrophysical Journal, marks a milestone for the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the National Science Foundation’s Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
Live video: Watch NSF’s IceCube science briefing
It also marks a milestone for an observational frontier known as multi-messenger astronomy, which takes advantage of multiple observatories looking at the sky in different ways. Thanks to IceCube’s alert, more than a dozen telescopes were able to triangulate on the neutrino’s source.
“No one telescope could have done this by themselves,” said IceCube lead scientist Francis Halzen, a physics professor at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
The source of the high-energy ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod