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View the longest total lunar eclipse of the 21st century on 27 July

12 Jul 2018, 12:16 UTC
View the longest total lunar eclipse of the 21st century on 27 July
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The total lunar eclipse of 27 July 2018 — the longest of the 21st century — is visible from Antarctica, Australasia, Russia (except northernmost parts), Asia, Africa, Scandanavia, Europe (though the Moon rises at mid-eclipse as seen from the centre of the UK) and Central/Eastern South America. This looping animation shows the eclipse’s progress from 1820—2220 UT at ten minute intervals. Astronomical North is up and East is left. AN animation by Ade Ashford.The total lunar eclipse of Friday, 27 July 2018 is the second and last to occur this year (the total lunar eclipse of 31 January was described here). A lunar eclipse occurs when the full Moon passes through the shadow of the Earth and a maximum of five such events can occur in a single year. The eclipse is deemed total if the Moon is fully immersed in the Earth’s central (or umbral) shadow and at such times we can say that we’re experiencing totality.
Schematic diagram of the shadow cast by the Earth. During a total lunar eclipse, the full Moon is shielded from direct illumination by the Sun within the Earth’s central umbral shadow. In contrast, within the penumbral shadow, only a portion of sunlight ...

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