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Fomalhaut b On the Move

30 Apr 2018, 15:03 UTC
Fomalhaut b On the Move
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Enlarge and enjoy. Fomalhaut b on its very long (1,700 year) and elliptica orbit, as seen here in five images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope over seven years. The reference to “20 au” means that the bar shows a distance of 20 astronomical units, or 20 times the distance from the sun to the Earth. (Jason Wang/Paul Kalas; UC Berkeley)
Direct imaging of exoplanets remains in its infancy, but goodness what a treat it is already and what a promise of things to come.
Almost all of the 3,714 exoplanets confirmed so far were detected via the powerful but indirect transit and radial velocity methods — measures of slightly decreased light as a planet crosses in front of its star, or the measured wobble of a star caused by the gravitational pull of a planet.
But now 44 planets have also been detected by telescopes — in space and on the ground — looking directly at distant stars. Using increasingly sophisticated coronagraphs to block out the blinding light of the stars, these tiny and often difficult-to-identify specks are nonetheless results that are precious to scientists and the public.
To me, they make exoplanet science accessible as perhaps nothing else ...

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