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Space Age Archaeology

In Wild Air: Venus, Voyager, and more of my favourite obsessions

10 Apr 2018, 00:17 UTC
In Wild Air: Venus, Voyager, and more of my favourite obsessions
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It's Monday <>, you are celestial.MOBILE VERSION — VISIT ARCHIVESMany thanks to the amazing Heath Killen for permission to republish this. You can find more of Heath's work here. Alice Gorman isIn Wild AirI’m an archaeologist who studies space exploration – the artefacts, the places, and the perspectives that lead to how we understand other worlds. Here I share some of my obsessions about space and time.PHOTO: ASHTON CLARIDGE / FLINDERS UNIVERSITYHelp us spread the good word.TO FRIENDSTO STRANGERSTO LOVERSCULTUREThe Venus of WillendorfThe Venus of Willendorf, discovered in Austria in 1908, must be one of the most famous and least understood women in all of human history. She was made during the Ice Ages, between 30 000 and 28 000 years ago. The 11 cm high figurine is carved from limestone and was originally thickly coated in red ochre.Without facial features, or even feet, she’s all sexuality with great breasts and belly and a well-defined vulva. A multitude of theories have swirled around her: mother goddess religions, matriarchal cultures, Palaeolithic pornography, prehistoric selfies, the power of post-menopausal women, cross-cultural communication.But she’s also a massive Palaeolithic fuck-you to the ideas of female attractiveness that are often investigated by evolutionary psychologists. This ...

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