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A meteoroid as seen from the Space Station

19 Nov 2017, 13:22 UTC
A meteoroid as seen from the Space Station
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This article was originally written by the European Space Agency. Continue reading via ESA.int, here.
A series of night-time photos were taken by ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli on 5 November around 22:33 GMT, here shown in a time-lapse with a 1-second interval, while the Space Station was flying from the southern Atlantic Ocean over to Kazakhstan. Paolo was lucky enough to capture a fast fireball falling to Earth over the Atlantic Ocean, off the South Africa west coast — look closely between 00:07 and 00:08 seconds at upper right in this video.
A fireball is basically a very bright meteoroid — a small bit of natural “space rock” — entering Earth’s atmosphere and burning brighter than the background stars. This particular meteoroid was moving much faster than typical, with an estimated speed of around 40 km/s, according to experts working on near-Earth objects (NEOs) in ESA’s Space Situational Awareness Programme.


Continue reading via ESA.int, here.
The post A meteoroid as seen from the Space Station appeared first on Blog - Asteroid Day.A series of night-time photos were taken by ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli on 5 November around 22:33 GMT, here shown in a time-lapse with a 1-second interval, ...

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