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Professional Disagreement Over Galaxies Escalates Into Bullying And Harassment

17 Nov 2017, 15:01 UTC
Professional Disagreement Over Galaxies Escalates Into Bullying And Harassment
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The overwhelmingly large brightness of the galaxies within a foreground cluster, like Abell S1063, shown here, make it a challenge to use gravitational lensing to identify ultra-faint, ultra-distant background galaxies. Image credit: NASA, ESA, and J. Lotz (STScI).No matter what the science says, there’s no excuse for cruel behavior to a colleague.Look out into the distant Universe as far as you possibly can, and you’ll come to the earliest galaxies we’ve ever observed. The Hubble Frontier Fields program was designed to make exactly these kind of faint, deep observations, and an incredible amount of science has come of it. One of the most spectacular effects is that of gravitational lensing, where a large foreground mass, like a galaxy cluster, bends and magnifies the starlight from background objects even more distant than the cluster. The Hubble Frontier Fields program imaged many such clusters, enabling us to find some of the galaxies behind them: candidates for the deepest, most distant galaxies ever seen in the entire Universe.Gravitational lenses, magnifying and distorting a background source, allow us to see fainter, more distant objects than ever before. Image credit: ALMA (ESO/NRAO/NAOJ), L. Calçada (ESO), Y. Hezaveh et al.Because these background, ultra-distant galaxies are so ...

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