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Exoplanet with density of Styrofoam discovered 320 light years away

19 May 2017, 11:44 UTC
Exoplanet with density of Styrofoam discovered 320 light years away
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This artist’s impression depicts KELT-11b, the ‘Styrofoam’ planet, orbiting its dying star. Image credit: Walter Robinson/Lehigh University
Astronomers at Lehigh University, Pennsylvania, United States, have revealed an unusual gas giant called KELT-11b using the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT). What makes this exoplanet so unusual is that it has the density of Styrofoam, a peculiar quality to have for a world larger than Jupiter. Researchers are intrigued about this planet, as they believe it can hold answers to the evolution of gas giants, in particularly inflated gas giants.
The ‘Styrofoam world’ orbits yellow subgiant star KELT-11, which rests 320 light years away. As KELT-11 is extremely bright, accurate measurements of the planetary atmosphere was undertaken, yielding some quirky findings. “It (KELT-11b) is highly inflated, so that while it’s only a fifth as massive as Jupiter, it is nearly 40 per cent larger, making it about as dense as Styrofoam, with an extraordinary thick atmosphere,” says Joshua Pepper, astronomer and assistant professor of physics at Lehigh University.
KELT-11b sits extremely close to its host star, meaning that its orbit lasts less then five days. Astronomers have speculated that the stars progression into a supergiant phase has affected the planet, possibly causing ...

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