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These Photos Taken from the Moon Show Lots and Lots of Stars

4 Apr 2017, 04:54 UTC
These Photos Taken from the Moon Show Lots and Lots of Stars
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Photo of a partially-lit Earth captured by the Far Ultraviolet Camera on Apollo 16. Note that stars are visible in the background. (NASA)
One of the favorite allegations by those who continue to be skeptical of the Apollo moon landings is that there are no stars visible in the photographs taken by the astronauts while they were “supposedly” on the Moon. Now while there’s a rather short but succinct list of why that’s the case (and feel free to review those reasons here) the truth is that there ARE stars visible in photographs taken from the Moon—photographs taken in ultraviolet light during the penultimate Apollo 16 mission in April of 1972.

The image above was captured with the Far Ultraviolet Camera/Spectrograph instrument that was set up on the lunar surface by Apollo 16 astronauts John Young and Charlie Duke on April 21, 1972.
The Far-UV Camera in position with Charlie Duke and the LRV in the background. (NASA: AS16-114-18439)
It was a gold-plated, 3-inch telescope and camera with a cesium iodide cathode and film cartridge, developed by African-American physicist Dr. George Carruthers while working at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. The camera was sensitive to light “at wavelengths between 500 ...

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