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Looking back at Huygens

14 Jan 2017, 11:13 UTC
Looking back at Huygens
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Big space anniversary today which will probably go unmarked by the media, as they scrabble to fill pages and airtime with the latest Trump stories and reports of NHS misery: twelve years ago today the Huygens lander, carried to Saturn by the Cassini space probe, set down on the surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan.
Titan was the classic enigmatic, mysterious moon, one of the most mysterious places in the whole solar system. The size of the planet Mercury, Titan is big enough to be visible from Earth through a small telescope or even through a really good pair of binoculars, looking like a tiny “star” close to the Ringed Planet.

Photos taken by the Voyager 1 space-probe as it whooshed through the Saturn system in 1980 showed the moon’s surface was hidden beneath an opaque atmosphere of thick, orange, smoggy gas, so the Huygens team had no real idea of what Titan’s surface was like, and the probe was designed to cope with various possibilities. In the end, after floating down through Titan’s atmosphere on a parachute and sending back breathtaking images of what were obviously – and unexpectedly, the channels of rivers of some sort, and the shorelines ...

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