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Direct Imaging Earth and Moon from Mars

8 Jan 2017, 21:46 UTC
Direct Imaging Earth and Moon from Mars
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Sometimes images arrive that make it clear that the space age is not a throw-away line, but a reality.
This one was taken by a satellite orbiting Mars, and it shows the Earth and the moon. Kind of remarkable, given that the camera — the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter — was 127 million miles away
And HiRISE is not a far-seeing telescope, but rather a camera designed to look down on Mars from 160 to 200 miles away, and to image the terrain, measure the compounds and minerals below, and keep an eye on Mars dust storms and climate.
The image is a composite image of Earth and its moon, combining the best Earth image with the best moon image from four sets of images acquired on Nov. 20, 2016 by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Each was separately processed prior to combining them so that the moon is bright enough to see. The moon is much darker than Earth and would barely be visible at the same brightness scale as Earth. The combined view retains the correct sizes and positions of the two ...

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