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Tim Kendall's Extreme Astrophysics

Combined VLA/ALMA view of the forming planetary system HL Tauri

26 Mar 2016, 22:17 UTC
Combined VLA/ALMA view of the forming planetary system HL Tauri
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Image: Combined ALMA (red) and VLA image of HL Tau. Credit: Carrasco-Gonzalez, et al.; Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF. The paper is Carrasco-Gonzalez et al., “The VLA view of the HL Tau Disk – Disk Mass, Grain Evolution, and Early Planet Formation,” accepted by Astrophysical Journal Letters (preprint). The image above is certainly ground-breaking, and has been noted extensively elsewhere. The age of the system is thought to be less than 100,000 (105) years and HL Tau itself is quite Sun-like, spectral type K5. It was already known to host a protoplanet (the bright clump in the yellow VLA data above) about 14 times as massive as Jupiter and about twice as far from HL Tau as Neptune is from our Sun. From the abstract:

The first long-baseline ALMA campaign resolved the disk around the young star HL Tau into a number of axisymmetric bright and dark rings. Despite the very young age of HL Tau these structures have been interpreted as signatures for the presence of (proto)planets. The ALMA images triggered numerous theoretical studies based on disk-planet interactions, magnetically driven disk structures, and grain evolution. Of special interest are the inner parts of disks, where terrestrial planets are expected to form. ...

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