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Tim Kendall's Extreme Astrophysics

ESO/ALMA imaging of planet formation in an Earth-like orbit

2 Apr 2016, 15:52 UTC
ESO/ALMA imaging of planet formation in an Earth-like orbit
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(phys.org) ALMA‘s best image of a protoplanetary disc to date. This picture of the nearby young star TW Hydrae reveals the classic rings and gaps that signify planets are in formation in this system. Credit: S. Andrews (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA); B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF); ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO). The star TW Hydrae is a popular target of study for astronomers because of its proximity to Earth and its status as an infant (or T Tauri) star about 10 million years old. Its distance has been recently re-calculated to be as close as 38 pc. The star itself is slightly less massive than the Sun, spectral type K8IVe (as given in an excellent recent review of young stars in nearby stellar associations here). It also has a face-on orientation as seen from Earth, giving astronomers a rare view of the complete protoplanetary disc around the star.

This is the inner region of the TW Hydrae protoplanetary disk as imaged by ALMA. The image has a resolution of 1 AU (Astronomical Unit, the distance from the Earth to the Sun in our own Solar System). This new ALMA image reveals a gap in the disk at 1 AU, suggesting that a planet with the same orbit ...

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