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Tim Kendall's Extreme Astrophysics

High precision radial velocity planet searches in the near-infrared

23 Apr 2016, 13:06 UTC
High precision radial velocity planet searches in the near-infrared
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System along with the recently measured spin rate of the planet Beta Pictoris b. Credit: ESO/I. Snellen (Leiden University). Spin rates are a different matter, but even radial velocities (RV) are notoriously hard to measure for the majority of nearby stars, which are M dwarfs, and this extends to brown dwarfs as well. Very new instrumental developments are beginning to allow RV to be measured in the near-infrared, where the spectra of these stars are less crowded with lines, allowing line widths to be measured properly, with RV and spin rates also much easier to determine. A natural extension into the planet-seeking arena follows. A new paper by Jonathan Gagné, Peter Plavchan (who is a pioneer in this field) and many co-authors has been accepted to the Astrophysical Journal and appears on arXiv:

We present the results of a precise near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) survey of 32 low-mass stars with spectral types K2-M4 using CSHELL at the NASA IRTF in the K-band with an isotopologue methane gas cell to achieve wavelength calibration and a novel iterative RV extraction method. We surveyed 14 members of young (≈ 25-150 Myr) moving groups, the young field star ε Eridani as well as ...

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