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Two Peculiar Low-Density Sub-Saturn-Mass Planets

29 Jun 2016, 22:00 UTC
Two Peculiar Low-Density Sub-Saturn-Mass Planets
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Bakos et al. (2016) present the discovery of two transiting low-density sub-Saturn-mass planets identified as HAT-P-47b and HAT-P-48b. Both planets orbit relatively bright F-type stars and have masses half-way between those of Neptune and Saturn. HAT-P-47b and HAT-P-48b were discovered through a combination of transit and radial velocity observations. Both HAT-P-47b and HAT-P-48b are very low density planets, and they are currently the two lowest mass planets known to have radii exceeding that of Jupiter's.Figure 1: Artist’s impression of an exoplanet.HAT-P-47b has 0.206 ± 0.039 times the mass and 1.313 ± 0.045 times the radius of Jupiter, giving it only ~11 percent the density of water. Its orbital period around its host star is 4.732 days and its estimated equilibrium temperature is 1605 ± 22 K. The host star of HAT-P-47b has 1.387 ± 0.038 times the mass and 1.515 ± 0.040 times the radius of the Sun. It also has 4.15 ± 0.27 times the Sun's luminosity and its surface temperature is 6703 ± 50 K. HAT-P-47b and its host star are both located ~900 light years away.HAT-P-48b has 0.168 ± 0.024 times the mass and 1.131 ± 0.054 times the radius of Jupiter, giving it only ~14 percent ...

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