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Frontier Fields Q&A: Redshift and Looking Back in Time

13 May 2014, 16:26 UTC
Frontier Fields Q&A: Redshift and Looking Back in Time
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Q: What do you mean when you say you’re “seeing some of the earliest galaxies in the universe?” How does looking into deep space allow you to look back in time?
The simple answer is that light travels and the universe is huge. Light travels very fast – 186,000 miles (300,000 km) per second, but it still has to move across the vast distances of space. Remember that for us to see anything – from the flash of a camera to the glow of a really distant galaxy, we have to wait for its light to strike our eyes.
That camera flash shows in our vision instantaneously because it doesn’t have far to go. But distances in the cosmos are so vast that it takes light a long time to reach us. The light from our closest companion, the Moon, takes about 1.3 seconds to cross the 239,000 miles (390,000 km) between us. So when you look up at the sky, you don’t see the Moon as it currently is. You see it as it appeared 1.3 seconds ago.
This is so 1.3 seconds ago.Credit: Luc Viatour, Wikimedia Commons
The greater the distances, the greater the time difference. Light from ...

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