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Anne’s Image of the Day: Galaxy Cluster Abell 1689

7 Apr 2014, 13:36 UTC
Anne’s Image of the Day: Galaxy Cluster Abell 1689
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April 7, 2014 Abell 1689, a galaxy cluster in Virgo Image Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), J. Blakeslee (NRC Herzberg Astrophysics Program, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory), and H. Ford (JHU) Abell 1689 is a galaxy cluster of some 2 million light-years across, located almost 2.5 billion light-years away in the constellation of [continue reading]

April 7, 2014
Abell 1689, a galaxy cluster in Virgo

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), J. Blakeslee (NRC Herzberg Astrophysics Program, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory), and H. Ford (JHU)
Abell 1689 is a galaxy cluster of some 2 million light-years across, located almost 2.5 billion light-years away in the constellation of Virgo (the Virgin), the second largest constellation in the sky (after Hydra, the Sea Serpent). Abell 1689 is racing away from us with a speed of about 49,863 kilometers per second!!
It is one of the biggest and most massive galaxy clusters known and acts as a gravitational lens, what is one of the predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity. The gravity of the cluster’s trillion stars — plus dark matter — acts as a 2-million-light-year-wide lens in space. This gravitational lens bends and magnifies the light of ...

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