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The western hemisphere gets a total lunar eclipse

6 Apr 2014, 00:00 UTC
The western hemisphere gets a total lunar eclipse
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The first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses happens the night of April 14 to 15 for most of the Americas and the Pacific. Parts of the Americas, the Pacific, and Australia get part of the event as the moon is rising or setting. Continue reading →

¡SkyCaramba! Weekly astronomy blog for the week ending April 12, 2014
The first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses happens the night of April 14 to 15 for most of the Americas and the Pacific. Parts of the Americas, the Pacific, and Australia get part of the event as the moon is rising or setting.

The very beginning of the eclipse is at 04:53 Universal Time on April 15. That will be 11:53pm on the 14th in the Central Time Zone of the United States. As the eclipse starts, the moon passes into the penumbra or outer part of Earth’s shadow. It will be several minutes—maybe more than a half hour—before you see the lighting difference.
As an orange hue slowly sweeps across the moon, the moon heads to the inner part of Earth’s shadow which it enters at 05:58. This is when the partial phase starts. You won’t have any trouble ...

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