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Anne’s Image of the Day: The Dragonfish Nebula

5 Apr 2014, 13:29 UTC
Anne’s Image of the Day: The Dragonfish Nebula
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April 5, 2014 The Dragonfish Nebula, an emission nebula in the Crux Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Toronto The Dragonfish Nebula, named for its resemblance to a terrifyingly toothy deep-sea fish on infrared images, is an emission nebula and star-forming region of about of 450 light-years across, located some 30,000 light-years away from Earth in [continue reading]

April 5, 2014
The Dragonfish Nebula, an emission nebula in the Crux

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Toronto
The Dragonfish Nebula, named for its resemblance to a terrifyingly toothy deep-sea fish on infrared images, is an emission nebula and star-forming region of about of 450 light-years across, located some 30,000 light-years away from Earth in the southern constellation of the Crux (but better known for the name of its cross-shaped asterism: the Southern Cross).
Due to the distance and location of this massive nebula, there’s a vast amount of interstellar material (such as gas and dust) between us and the Dragonfish, absorbing its light, so in optical light it’s essentially invisible. But infrared light can pierce that fog, and the image above was taken using NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to look in the infrared.
In 2010 the first hint of a star cluster was ...

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