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Anne’s Image of the Day: Superbubble DEM L50

25 Mar 2014, 13:58 UTC
Anne’s Image of the Day: Superbubble DEM L50
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March 25, 2014 DEM L50, a superbubble in the LMC Image Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Michigan/A.E.Jaskot; Optical: NOAO/CTIO/MCELS DEM L50 (also known as N186) is a superbubble of about 950 light-years across, located some 163,000 light-years away from Earth in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy to our Milky Way, in the [continue reading]

March 25, 2014
DEM L50, a superbubble in the LMC

Image Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Michigan/A.E.Jaskot; Optical: NOAO/CTIO/MCELS
DEM L50 (also known as N186) is a superbubble of about 950 light-years across, located some 163,000 light-years away from Earth in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy to our Milky Way, in the southern constellation of Mensa (the Table Mountain).
The shape of DEM L50 is approximately an ellipse, with a supernova remnant named SNR N186 D, located on the northern edge of Dem L50 (the small, very bright, flower-shaped object).
Superbubbles are found in regions where massive stars have formed in the last few million years. These massive stars produce intense radiation, expel matter at high speeds, and race through their evolution to explode as supernovae. The winds and supernova shock waves carve out huge cavities called superbubbles in the surrounding gas.

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