Home » News & Blogs » Anne’s Image of the Day: Globular Cluster Omega Centauri
Bookmark and Share
Anne's Astronomy News

Anne’s Image of the Day: Globular Cluster Omega Centauri

20 Mar 2014, 13:16 UTC
Anne’s Image of the Day: Globular Cluster Omega Centauri
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

March 20, 2013 Omega Centauri, a globular cluster in Centaurus Image Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler Omega Centauri (also known as NGC 5139) is a globular cluster of approximately 172 light-years across, located about 15,800 light-years away from Earth in the large, southern constellation of Centaurus (the Centaur). The cluster is estimated to be [continue reading]

March 20, 2013
Omega Centauri, a globular cluster in Centaurus

Image Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler
Omega Centauri (also known as NGC 5139) is a globular cluster of approximately 172 light-years across, located about 15,800 light-years away from Earth in the large, southern constellation of Centaurus (the Centaur). The cluster is estimated to be roughly 11.5 billion years old, and contains over ten million stars.
It is the brightest, largest and, with some 4 to 5 million solar masses, it is about 10 times as massive as other big globulars that are orbiting through our Milky Way galaxy, and it has about the same mass as the smallest whole galaxies. The stars in the core of Omega Centauri are so crowded that they are estimated to average only 0.1 light-year away from each other.
Most of the stars visible now in Omega Centauri are ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod