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On a lighter note: Royal Navy makes its bid for another Ig Nobel peace prize by torpedoing dockside security fence

17 Mar 2014, 14:08 UTC
On a lighter note: Royal Navy makes its bid for another Ig Nobel peace prize by torpedoing dockside security fence
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In its previous Space Intelligence News incarnation, this blog previously noted that the British Royal Navy won the the Ig Nobel Peace Prize in 2000 (an irreverent alternative version of the Nobel prize) for ordering its sailors to save money on cannon shells during training exercises by shouting “BANG!” instead of actually firing any. Well now the Royal Navy must be favourite to be the first outfit to pick up ithe IgNobel Peace prize for a second time.
This time the Royal Navy actually managed to fire a real weapon: a Stingray anti-submarine torpedo was fired from the starboard side of HMS Argyll, a Duke-class Type 23 frigate, on 12 March 2014. The problem was that the ship was in port at the time. Thankfully, the weapon, which reportedly flew through the air, did not have a live warhead and the only thing “sunk” was a security fence followed by metal container on the Devonport dockside in Plymouth.
Thank goodness the Royal Navy does not apparently see fit not to arm its torpedoes with live warheads when in harbour. And thank heavens they are not scooting around in space armed with Star Trek-style “photon” torpedoes either.
Stringray Torpedo ...

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