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Anne’s Image of the Day: The Large Magellanic Cloud

15 Mar 2014, 13:46 UTC
Anne’s Image of the Day: The Large Magellanic Cloud
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March 15, 2014 The LMC, an irregular dwarf galaxy in Dorado Image Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is an irregular dwarf galaxy, and a satellite of our Milky Way galaxy. It is only some 14,000 light-years across , and is located about 163,000 light-years away from the Earth in [continue reading]

March 15, 2014
The LMC, an irregular dwarf galaxy in Dorado

Image Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler
The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is an irregular dwarf galaxy, and a satellite of our Milky Way galaxy. It is only some 14,000 light-years across , and is located about 163,000 light-years away from the Earth in the southern constellation of Dorado (the Swordfish). Together with the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), they form the gravitationally bound Magellanic Clouds that are orbiting the Milky Way. The LMC has a mass of approximately 1010 billion times the mass of the Sun, making it roughly 1/100 as massive as the Milky Way.
This galaxy is the fourth largest in the Local Group, after the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), the Milky Way, and the Triangulum Galaxy (M33). And, it is the third closest galaxy to the Milky Way, with the Sagittarius Dwarf ...

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