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The all-inclusive solar eclipse

3 Nov 2013, 00:00 UTC
The all-inclusive solar eclipse
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A rare hybrid solar eclipse occurs on November 3. Most of the visibility area gets a partial eclipse. That's normal. But along the path of the central eclipse running from the Sargasso Sea part of the Atlantic Ocean and into central Africa, it's an annular eclipse at first. Then it becomes a total eclipse. Usually, it's one or the other. Continue reading →

¡SkyCaramba! Weekly astronomy blog for the week ending November 9, 2013
A rare hybrid solar eclipse occurs on November 3. Most of the visibility area gets a partial eclipse. That’s normal. But along the path of the central eclipse running from the Sargasso Sea part of the Atlantic Ocean and into central Africa, it’s an annular eclipse at first. Then it becomes a total eclipse. Usually, it’s one or the other.
An annular eclipse happens when the moon passes right in front of the sun, but the moon is too far away to block the sun completely. The sun’s disk looks a little bigger than the moon’s. So you see a bright ring around a filled in black circle. The name for this eclipse comes from the Latin word annulus which means ring.
The closer the moon ...

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