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ISERVE to serve: A visit to the NASA/USAID SERVIR Coordination Office

30 Apr 2012, 20:41 UTC
ISERVE to serve: A visit to the NASA/USAID SERVIR Coordination Office
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Samantha Snabes shares how the SERVIR project integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor and forecast environmental changes and to improve response to natural disasters.

It seemed to be good to be true. Last fall, my friend and OpenGov colleague Ali Llewellyn shared with me that there was a group of NASA employees and contractors supporting an initiative to connect satellite resources to better the world. I had to know more.
A simple Google search uncovered a webpage for the project, known as SERVIR or, to serve, in Spanish. Here, I learned that the SERVIR initiative integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor and forecast environmental changes and to improve response to natural disasters. This enables scientists, educators, project managers and policy implementers to better respond to a range of issues including disaster management, agricultural development, biodiversity conservation and climate change. Principally supported by NASA and the US Agency of International Development, or USAID, a strong emphasis is placed on partnerships to fortify the availability of searchable and viewable earth observations, measurements, animations, and analysis.
Impressive, yes, but how do they do it and who are the people involved? This question and others ...

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